On nurturing the emergent SoTL researcher: responding to challenges and opportunities

I’m thrilled to share this study on how we can support researchers who are new to the scholarship of teaching and learning. This study is particularly meaningful for me not only because of the importance of the topic, but also because I gained extremely valuable insights and experiences collaborating on this research with educational developers and students as research partners (Celia Popovic, Laura Farrugia, Salma Saleh, Geneviève Maheux-Pelletier, and Mandy Frake-Mistak). Working on this study largely ignited my interest in students as research partners, which I’ve examined with my colleagues (the corresponding paper is currently in press in the journal Imagining SoTL) and am currently collaboratively writing a book chapter on this topic with a student partner.

Introducing Teaching and Learning Research (TLR) In Action

About half a year ago I started a non-profit corporation called Teaching and Learning Research In Action (TLR for short). Our mission statement: “We investigate the efficacy of teaching practices and make our findings public, particularly through non-traditional forms of dissemination”. Today we had our first group meeting. Here is some footage of our group discussing what excites us most about TLR. For more information about TLR please visit our website: https://tlraction.com.

Pop-up Poetry at the 2019 Symposium on SoTL

Pop-up poetry is definitely one of the highlights of the annual Symposium on Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) for me. I was guided through an insightful, reflective process on student partnerships by Richard Harrison, resulting in ‘Evolution’ (the poem in the photo above). I’m very grateful to the Institute for SoTL and the organizers of the Symposium on SoTL for such an amazing symposium.

York University’s Cross-Campus Capstone Classroom: 2019/20 Pitch Day!

The Cross-Campus Capstone Classroom (C4) brings together third- and fourth-year students from across York University to work together in multi-disciplinary teams. Each team is partnered with an external organization to work together on solving a pressing, real-world challenge. Today the partner organizations visited York to pitch their projects to our capstone students – there was lots of innovation, dialogue, and enthusiasm! I’m excited to see which projects are selected, and how they progress throughout this school year.

I’m excited and proud to be part of the C4 Leadership Team. For more information about C4, please click here.

Understanding the impact of attendance and participation on academic achievement

Our paper on the impact of attendance and participation on academic achievement is now available online! Here is a pre-formatted version of the paper.

In this study, we provide evidence demonstrating that it is not enough for students to be physically present in class to do well in a course – students’ engagement in class, not attendance, is predictive of their achievement in the course.

Thanks to all my co-authors – Sharry Shakory, Arman Azad, Celia Popovic and Lillian Park – for a great collaboration!

Cognition and Education

I just received my copy of “The Cambridge Handbook of Cognition and Education” – looking forward to reading it cover to cover! I’m honoured to be a contributor, among many scholars I look up to.

Our ‘Statistics for SoTL’ course is now accredited by the EDC!

I had the privilege of working with Dr. Natasha May (Educational Developer at the Teaching Commons, York University) to co-create and co-facilitate a course for graduate students on providing statistical support for SoTL researchers.
Our course is now accredited by the Educational Developers Caucus (EDC), which is a huge win! Many thanks to Natasha for being such a fantastic partner throughout this whole process!

The spacing effect stands up to big data

Our new paper, “The spacing effect stands up to big data”, is now accessible here. We analyzed longitudinal data from 10,514 individuals, collected in the context of naturally occurring workplace training. Our results revealed a significant interaction between spacing interval and retention interval: the optimal amount of spacing between repeated retrieval events increased as the retention interval increased. These findings are in line with the results of laboratory studies, demonstrating the relevance and transferability of laboratory-based research to real-world contexts.

A big thank you to my co-authors for their contributions to the study, as well as Carol Leaman and the entire Axonify team for such a great, ongoing collaboration.